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Archive for the Physical Activity Category

Published on: April 16, 2014  

The Importance of Keeping Kids Active

These days, it seems that every time you turn around there’s something about obesity in the news. We’re hearing about how obesity is continually on the rise amongst adults across the country, and even more alarming, approximately one third of children in the United States are overweight or obese.

This puts our children at risk for a number of adverse physical and emotional health outcomes including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, social stigma, low self esteem and depression. To combat this issue, we’ve been given recommendations on how to clean up kids’ diets and increase their physical activity, and the integral role parents play in that process. But when parents hear that kids should be getting at least 60 minutes of physical activity per day, it can seem like a rather daunting task. It can seem even more difficult considering the pull of technology keeping us glued to our seats. Check out these suggestions for incorporating physical activity a part of your daily routine.

Walk whenever possible. Walk with your kids to school at least once a week. If you live too far away to walk, you can park a couple of blocks away and walk from there. If you live closer, walk to school more often. Start having a regular family walk after dinner or take the family dog for a walk. Try to walk to regular activities, like sports, etc., whenever possible.

Limit sedentary behavior. Limit time watching T.V., playing video games and working on the computer for two hours or less per day. Take activity breaks when watching T.V. or working on the computer. Encourage your kids to get up and walk around or do some sit-ups or jumping jacks to re-energize. Get moving in and around the house: go outside to garden, clean up the yard, rake the leaves or wash the car. Keep your kids involved in active household chores.

Keep activities fun and creative. Allow your kids to choose an after-school sports activity they like or may be interested in. Encourage your kids to engage in physical activity with their friends they can play basketball, jump rope or go for bike rides. Be sure to check out local park & recreation locations (LaceyOlympia & Tumwater) and activities.

Above all, remember to be a good model for your children. They won’t take physical activity and their health seriously if you don’t either. Join an exercise group or find one that parents and kids can participate in together. Engaging in physical activity as a family not only keeps you and your kids healthy, but it can keep family relationships strong as well.  Check out similar articles on Child Obesity and Physical Activity in Kids & Teens in our Blog Archives as well as tips on Parenting Teens in the Resources section of our website.

Please give us a call should you need some additional help in developing strategies to keep your child or teen active, 360.236.0206.  We’re here to help!

Warmest Regards,

Gyro Psychology Services

360.236.0206

866.616.4976

Published on: March 5, 2014  

Keeping Your Child & Teen Active

These days, it seems that every time you turn around there’s something about obesity in the news. We’re hearing about how obesity is continually on the rise amongst adults across the country, and even more alarming, approximately one third of children in the United States are overweight or obese.

This puts our children at risk for a number of adverse physical and emotional health outcomes including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, social stigma, low self esteem and depression. To combat this issue, we’ve been given recommendations on how to clean up kids’ diets and increase their physical activity, and the integral role parents play in that process. But when parents hear that kids should be getting at least 60 minutes of physical activity per day, it can seem like a rather daunting task. It can seem even more difficult considering the pull of technology keeping us glued to our seats. Check out these suggestions for incorporating physical activity a part of your daily routine.

Walk whenever possible. Walk with your kids to school at least once a week. If you live too far away to walk, you can park a couple of blocks away and walk from there. If you live closer, walk to school more often. Start having a regular family walk after dinner or take the family dog for a walk. Try to walk to regular activities, like sports, etc., whenever possible.

Limit sedentary behavior. Limit time watching T.V., playing video games and working on the computer for two hours or less per day. Take activity breaks when watching T.V. or working on the computer. Encourage your kids to get up and walk around or do some sit-ups or jumping jacks to re-energize. Get moving in and around the house: go outside to garden, clean up the yard, rake the leaves or wash the car. Keep your kids involved in active household chores.

Keep activities fun and creative. Allow your kids to choose an after-school sports activity they like or may be interested in. Encourage your kids to engage in physical activity with their friends they can play basketball, jump rope or go for bike rides. Be sure to check out local park & recreation locations (LaceyOlympia & Tumwater) and activities.

Above all, remember to be a good model for your children. They won’t take physical activity and their health seriously if you don’t either. Join an exercise group or find one that parents and kids can participate in together. Engaging in physical activity as a family not only keeps you and your kids healthy, but it can keep family relationships strong as well.  Check out similar articles on Child Obesity and Physical Activity in Kids & Teens in our Blog Archives as well as tips on Parenting Teens in the Resources section of our website.

Please give us a call should you need some additional help in developing strategies to keep your child or teen active, 360.236.0206.  We’re here to help!

Warmest Regards,

Gyro Psychology Services

360.236.0206

866.616.4976

Health Disclaimer

Published on: May 22, 2013  

Boosting Your Child’s Activity Level

Eating right, getting enough sleep, drinking water, and exercise are all important for living a healthy life. However, as gym programs get cut and children find increasingly more entertainment from technology, it’s getting harder to get children to exercise regularly. There are numerous benefits to exercising. Exercise helps in controlling weight, reducing blood pressure, reducing the risk of diabetes and some cancers, strengthening bones, and improving psychological well-being.  Physical fitness has also been associated with increased life expectancy, better sleep, and a better ability to handle stress. The American Heart Association recommends that children over the age of 2 should get at least 60 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise each day. This can be done in one chunk or broken up into smaller chunks of time to fit into your schedule.

The three aspects of fitness are: aerobic activity, anaerobic activity, and flexibility.

Examples of aerobic activity:

  • Running
  • Walking
  • Jumping robe
  • Biking
  • Swimming
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Dance

Examples of anaerobic activity:

  • Sit ups
  • Pull-ups
  • Push-ups
  • Weights (if old enough)
  • Climbing
  • Gymnastics
  • Martial arts

Examples of flexibility training:

  • Yoga
  • Gymnastics
  • Dance
  • Daily stretching
  • Martial arts

As you can see there is a lot of cross-over between the lists. A lot of activities can help your child get in all their fitness needs at once. This list is just a sample of the activities out there and your child may need to try a few to find something they like. Also, it’s important to remember that exercise doesn’t have to be structured. Exercise can be as simple as playing tag on the playground, helping with yard work, or taking a family hike. If your child isn’t motivated to exercise try suggesting doing something as a family. Exercising together can be fun and helps everyone stay healthy!

Check out the Sports and Recreation and Featured Activity sections of our sister website Go-Gyro-Go for more resources on how to keep you and your family active.

Warmest Regards,

Gyro Psychology Services

Olympia, Washington

360.236.0206

866.616.GYRO

Health Disclaimer